And the winner is…post-truth!

And the winner is…post-truth!

Every November, as the calendar year is winding down, the folks at Oxford Dictionaries in the UK select a word or expression that has attracted a great deal of interest during that year. They choose the winning term based on criteria such as the number of times it is searched online. They call it “The Word of the Year.” The Oxford team tends to choose a word that captures the ethos, mood, or preoccupations of that year. In 2013, the word of the year was selfie: a picture you take of yourself with a smartphone. In 2015, it was emoji: you know,...Read more …
Doing love

Doing love

A Greek writer named Lucian, who lived around A.D. 120-200, once said this of the early Christians: It is incredible to see the fervor with which the people of that religion help each other in their wants. They spare nothing. Their first legislator [Jesus] has put it into their heads that they are all brethren. Jenn’s story Jenn recently confessed she never really associated everything Jesus “put into [our] heads” to do—for our fellow believers and for others—with love. She associated things like feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, and visiting those in prison, with a “to-do” list—things she was supposed to do because, well, that’s...Read more …
Something worth practicing

Something worth practicing

Here’s a radio-minute that aired nationally this week on Q Place’s Walk the Way: This is Walk the Way, brought to you by Q Place, I’m Jeff Klein. And I’m Pam Klein. We don’t need to look any farther than Jesus’ example for ways to move out in mission. Jesus noticed people. People like Zaccheaus and the crippled man at the pool of Bethesda. Jesus initiated countless conversations. Remember the story of the Samaritan woman at the well? Jesus intentionally went out of his way to engage with her, notice her and ask her some questions. Jesus prayed. The Bible records Jesus...Read more …
Are you marked by joy?

Are you marked by joy?

Drew Dyck, author, acquisitions editor at Moody Publishers, and senior editor at CTPastors.com, recently wrote: My evangelist friend Thomas gave me a surprising bit of advice for sharing my faith with non-Christians. “For goodness’ sake, enjoy your faith!” he bellowed in his distinctive Malaysian accent. “Christians get so tense and serious. They forget to show their friends and family that the Christian life is filled with joy.” Religion is a contentious topic these days and the conversations surrounding it are often downright nasty. It’s easy to get stuck in a defensive crouch and lose our joy when we tackle the topic. But...Read more …
2 more steps for creating a missional culture in your church

2 more steps for creating a missional culture in your church

Not too long ago, On Q talked about a very important first step in creating a missional culture in your church: facing the facts. Although it can be hard to take an honest look at your church’s missional culture, there’s a very good chance that doing so will be the key to jumpstarting important changes and shifts in your church’s mindset and ministry. The first step in building a missional culture in any church is to be strong and courageous–you must set aside the fear of being honest with yourself and your congregation. Once you’ve taken an honest assessment and accepted the reality, here are two more things...Read more …
Truth: irrelevant?

Truth: irrelevant?

Here’s a radio-minute that aired nationally this week on Q Place’s Walk the Way: This is Walk the Way, brought to you by Q Place, I’m Jeff Klein. And I’m Pam Klein. Every November, the folks at Oxford Dictionaries in the UK select a word or expression that has attracted a great deal of interest during that year. In 2013, the word of the year was selfie: by now, most of us know what that is. In 2015, it was emoji: you know—those small digital images or icons used as shorthand to express an idea or emotion. In 2016 the word of...Read more …
Are you asking your church the right questions?

Are you asking your church the right questions?

Robert Hodge coaches leaders, emerging leaders, and boards to their “preferred future” and just recently shared some interesting thoughts in a blog about how asking the right questions can help any organization innovate and gain new insights. In this blog, he concentrates his thoughts around Kelcie Miller-Anderson, an amazing young woman, scientist, researcher, and environmentalist, who recalls her infatuation with the question “Why?” Dandelions? Kelcie Miller-Anderson of Calgary, Ontario, was only 15 years old when she began to wonder why it was possible for dandelions to grow in places nothing else could. Seven years later, Kelcie’s questions have resulted in research that could...Read more …
Why is serving WITH people who believe differently, so important?

Why is serving WITH people who believe differently, so important?

The idea of serving people in order to communicate God’s grace is hardly novel. “Bringing the whole gospel to the whole person” marks both contemporary missional churches and longstanding mission organizations. Yet, if we limit ourselves to serving people in order to demonstrate God’s love for them, we may be ignoring an even more loving, relational, authentic and dynamic approach–serving together with people who believe differently. Together Together is the key word. The dynamic changes when people do something together; the rules change when you are in relationship. Consider John’s story: When I was in grade school, I played multiple...Read more …
How’s your short game?

How’s your short game?

Here’s a radio-minute that aired nationally this week on Q Place’s Walk the Way: This is Walk the Way. Brought to you by Q Place, I’m Jeff Klein. How’s your short game? When I want to practice my golf, I usually head out to the driving range: I get a large bucket of balls and swing away until they’re gone. After all, it’s impressive if you can hit your ball hundreds of yards down the fairway. Long drives solicit oohs and aahs. And respect. But if you know anything about golf, you know that the game is won on or around the...Read more …
Success hinges on how well you welcome

Success hinges on how well you welcome

Danny Spitzberg’s work is primarily interested in “community spaces” and how people move from “do it yourself” to “do it together.” He is particularly interested in how to welcome people to a space and make those who visit feel welcomed by the community that works and plays there. Emphasizing how crucial the initial encounter is, he agrees with Lori Kane who puts it this way: “If you do just one thing: Say ‘Welcome! I’m so glad you’re here!‘” Perhaps even more importantly, he understands that the success of any organization is getting their visitors to stay and become part of the community themselves. In...Read more …